Music History

Music and Politics in Pre-Revolutionary France (MUSI W4150, NEW for Fall 2014!)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Music and Politics in Pre-Revolutionary France
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI W4150
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Julia Doe

Fall 2014
Music MUSI W4150

MUSIC & POLITICS IN PRE-REVOLUTIONARY FRANCE (New for 2014!)
Section 001 Call Number: 27746 Points: 3 
Day/Time: MW 11:40am-12:55pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Julia Doe (bio)

This course examines the relationship between musical and political institutions in France, from the reign of Louis XIV through the fall of the monarchy. We will 1) survey the development of musical style through listening and analysis; and 2) investigate how representative works reflected broad changes in the production and consumption of music during the grand siecle and age of Enlightenment. Topics will include: systems of court patronage and theatrical privilege; the rise of music criticism in the public sphere; the influence of the philosophes; salon culture; and the role of the arts in the historiography of the Revolution.

Listening to Hip-Hop

Course Information

Course Title: 
Listening to Hip-Hop
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V3395
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Ellie Hisama

Fall 2014 Music V3395
LISTENING TO HIP-HOP

Section 001
Call Number: 24116 Points: 3 
Day/Time: MW 2:40pm-3:55pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Ellie Hisama

An interdisciplinary exploration of hip-hop music and culture from its beginnings to the present through historical, analytical, and critical perspectives. The course's primary focus will be on critical listening. Readings will help to situate particular pieces of music, artists, and genres within their cultural, political, and social contexts. Using through historical, analytical, and critical perspectives, we will examine hip-hop's complex relationships to politics, race, gender, sexuality, class, region, and diaspora as evident in performances, recordings, videos, films, and popular culture.

Asian Humanities: Musics of India & West Asia (AHMM V3321y Fall 2014)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Asian Music Humanities: Musics of India and West Asia
CU Directory Course Number: 
AHMM V3321y
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Melissa Bilal (Section 1); Niko Higgins (Section 2)

Fall 2014 Asian Humanities: MUSI/AHMM V3321
MUSICS OF INDIA & WEST ASIA
(2 Sections)

SECTION 001
Call Number: 18554 Points: 3
Day/Time: MW 6:10pm-7:25pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Melissa Bilal
__________________________________
SECTION 002
Call Number: 26410 Points: 3
Day/Time: MW 6:10pm-7:25pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Nicholas Higgins

A topical approach to concepts and practices of music in relation to other arts in the development of South and Asian civilizations.  Subjects will include both classical and vernacular traditions, including diasporic idioms.  Global Core and fulfills Music Humanities requirements for students in General Studies.  

20th Century Music (MUSI V3172, Fall 2014)

Course Information

Course Title: 
20th Century Music
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V3172
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. George Lewis

Fall 2014
Music V3172
20TH CENTURY MUSIC
Section 001
Call Number: 65591 Points: 3 
Day/Time: MW 10:10am-11:25am
Location: To be announced
Instructor: George Lewis (bio)

A multicultural survey of composers, improvisers, sounds, practices and social issues in the music of "the long 20th century." Engages form, technique, genre, style, canon, media reception, constructions of gender and race, cultural nationalisms, and the impact of transnationalism and globalization. Reading knowledge of music is very helpful but not required.

History of Western Music: Middle Ages-Baroque (MUSI V3128 Fall 2014)

Course Information

Course Title: 
History of Western Music: Middle Ages-Baroque
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V3128
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Susan Boynton

Fall 2014
Music V3128
HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC: MIDDLE AGES-BAROQUE
Section 001
Call Number: 28382 Points: 3 
Day/Time: TR 2:40pm-3:55pm
Location: To be announced
Notes: MUSIC MAJORS/CONCE PRIORITY
Instructor: Susan Boynton  (bio)

Pre- or co requisite:V2318-V2319. Topics in Western music from Antiquity through Bach and Handel, focusing on the development of musical style and thought, and analysis of selected works.

 

The Music of Russia: A Survey (MUSI V2145, Fall 2014)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Russian Music: A Survey
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V2138
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Deborah Bradley-Kramer

Fall 2012 Music V2138
RUSSIAN MUSIC
Section 001 Call Number: 63017 Points: 3  
Day/Time: MW 11:40am-12:55pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Deborah J Bradley-Kramer

This course is detailed survey of Russian national and international composers from Glinka to Shostakovich, and will also address Russian realism, orientalism, the relationship between composers and poets of the Russian Symbolist era, the Ballets Russes, Soviet film music, and musical aesthetics. A knowledge of Russian is not required.  

"Masterpieces of Western Music" ("Music Humanities" W1123, Fall 2014)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Masterpieces of Western Music (Music Humanities)
CU Directory Course Number: 
HUMA W1123
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Members of the Music Department Faculty. For inquiries, contact the Music Department office

Fall 2014 HUMA W1123
"Masterpieces of Western Music"
("Music Humanities" Core Curriculum Course)

This course is offered every semester in multiple sections and at various times and locations.  Please see the table below for available sections and current enrollments.  Sections are capped at 25 students.

Masterpieces of Western Music is the Department's flagship course, our contribution to Columbia's esteemed Core Curriculum, and required of every student in Columbia College.  More information on Music Humanities (and a list of online resources) can be found here.

Registration Procedure: All information concerning registration in HUMA W1123 is included in the registration materials sent to students. It is the expectation of the College that all students complete Music Humanities by the end of their third year.

Description: Part of the Core Curriculum since 1947, "Music Humanities'' aims to instill in students a basic comprehension of the many forms of the Western musical imagination. 

Critical Approaches to Music Technologies (MUSI S3142, Summer 2014)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Critical Approaches to Music Technologies
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI S3142
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Lucie Vagnerova

NEW SUMMER COURSE for 2014!

Course Title: Critical Approaches to Music Technologies
CU Directory Course Number:  MUSI S3142
Section: 001 Points/Credits:  3
Instructor:  Lucie Vagnerova (Summer Teaching Scholars Program, PhD Candidate in Historical Musicology)
Instructor Email: lv2252@columbia.edu
 

Course Description: Electronic and digital sound technologies have come to define many popular and avant-garde musical practices of the 20th and 21st centuries. How do technological histories factor into musical meaning? How do sound technologies shape musical discourse at large? Through guided listening and multidisciplinary readings, the course will trace the various ways sound-technological practices trouble classical musical concepts such as ownership, authorship, musical value, embodiment, performance, or virtuosity, and call for new constructs such as sound synthesis, liveness, mediation, or fair use. The course brings together the first music studios, World War II cryptography, synthesized voices, earbuds, Detroit Techno, karaoke, and Columbia's own Computer Music Center.

Open to all majors.

New Course for Fall 2013: Music and Rituals in East Asian Traditions (EALAC W3960)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Music and Ritual in East Asian Traditions
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI 83960
Instructor: 
Prof. Rachel Chung

EALAC W3960/MUSI 83960
Music and Ritual in East Asian Traditions

New For Fall 2013:
Call Number: 83960
Instructor: Prof. Rachel Chung
W 4:10pm-6:00pm
522A Kent Hall

 

East Asian traditions have long emphasized MUSIC and RITES (as opposed to rights) as complementary foundations of governance and civil society. But if rites are widely recognized today as the basis of traditional East Asian social intercourse, under standing the centrality of the kind of music known as yue (?) has been more elusive. Yet this yue--as conceptual counterpart to rites, as practical science of the "mandate of Heaven," as civil political discourse, as guided expression of the human condition in nature, etc.-- represented the confluence of East Asian social, political, and intellectual idealism and realism. This course examines the changing discourse and practice of yue over the span of East Asian history, to ask what ultimately distinguishes yue--and therefore the East Asian utopian vision--from other musical/intellectual traditions of the world, and what relevance this might carry for East Asian leadership in the 21st century.

Seminar in Historical Musicology: Sound and Image in The Middle Ages (Fall 2013)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Seminar in Historical Musicology: Sound and Image in the Middle Ages
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G8101
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Susan Boynton

Seminar in Historical Musicology: The Middle Ages

FALL 2013:

MUSI G8101

Call number: 88961

Prof. Susan Boynton

F 10:00am-12:00pm

701A Dodge Hall
 

Whether sensuous or abstract, angelic or demonic, the idea and experience of music were vividly portrayed in medieval art. This seminar on the meanings of music in medieval visual culture will examine the elusive relationship between sound and image. Some of the topics to be addressed include the symbolic uses of music and musicians in the visual arts; the illustration of music manuscripts (such as the Cantigas de Santa Maria); the role of musical ideas in the construction of images (such as the capitals of the modes from Cluny); the place of acoustics in church design; and visual aspects of medieval soundscapes. We will read the work of medievalists in several disciplines as well as scholarship from other contexts (such as Bonnie Wade's Imaging Sound). Some class meetings will take place at the Metropolitan Museum and the Cloisters.

The Opera (MUSI V2025, Fall 2013)

Course Information

Course Title: 
The Opera
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V2025
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Marilyn McCoy

MUSI V2025
The Opera
3 pts.

FALL 2013:
Call Number: 22003
Prof. Marilyn McCoy
Day/Time: MW 6:10pm-7:25pm
Location: 404 Dodge Hall

Love! Death! Passion! Betrayal! Magic! All of these, and more, emanate from opera, a genre where music, literature, and drama combine to create sounding artworks with multiple layers of meaning. In this course we will focus on getting to know FIVE operatic masterworks very well, each in a different language, drawn from the Classical, Romantic, and Modern eras of music history: Mozart ?s The Magic Flute (1791, German); Verdi ?s Rigoletto (1851, Italian); Bizet ?s Carmen (1875, French); Tchaikovsky ?s Eugene Onegin (1877, Russian); and Britten ?s A Midsummer Night ?s Dream (1960, English). Special attractions include attendance at two to three live opera performances, live classroom demonstrations by singers, and a backstage tour of the Metropolitan Opera of New York. Open to music majors and non-majors who have taken "Masterpieces of Western Music."

MUSI W4420 Music and Property

Course Information

Course Title: 
Music and Property
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI W4420
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Aaron Fox

MUSI W4420
Music and Property
Section 001 Call Number: 66829 Points: 3   
Instructor: Aaron A Fox (bio)


This is an upper-level undergraduate lecture/discussion course (also open to graduate students by instructor permission). The goal of the course is to survey the pragmatic, ethical, and philosophical dimensions of assertions that "music" is something that can be "owned" by individuals, groups, governments, or private institutions. Because this is a sweeping topic, and one only recently emergent within musical scholarship as a major alternative to approaches through aesthetics, cognition/perception, performance, or social history, this course will be designed with a focus on several major domains of current debate and emergent scholarly focus: current conflicts over the practice of "illegal downloading" of copyrighted music from file sharing networks; digital sampling and music production; the appropriation of cultural value in "world music;" and the question of "cultural property rights" with respect to Native and Indigenous cultural heritage materials (including music recordings) held in archives and museums in the US (the focus of the instructor's own work).

Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Music, Affect, and Public Culture (MUSI G9402)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Music, Affect, and Public Culture
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G9402
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Ellen Gray

 

MUSI G9402 (Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology)

Music, Affect, and Public Culture
Instructor: Ellen Gray (bio)
Call #: 28037, 3 pts 

Thursdays 12:10pm-2:00pm, 701C Dodge

Musical anthropology and ethnomusicology have tentatively begun to work with "affect" as a keyword for understanding how contemporary cultures of musical circulation and listening shape publics and mobilize sentiment. But what is "affect"? How does it differ from "emotion"? How might one go about ethnographi- cally studying affect when sound/music/aesthetics are the object of inquiry? This seminar places two con- temporary interdisciplinary "turns" in the social sciences and humanities (the "acoustic turn" and the "affective turn") in productive alignment. We track genealogies of the following keywords and terms through relevant theoretical and ethnographic literatures: "listening"; "voice"; "emotion"; "structures of feeling"; "affect"; "public feeling" and "publics" while thinking through the possibilities of "affect" for anthropologies of sound and music.

NEW SEMINAR: Debussy and Modernism (MUSI G8371)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Debussy and Modernism
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G8371
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Benjamin Steege

 

MUSI G8371 (New Seminar for Spring 2013)

Debussy and Modernism
Instructor: Prof. Benjamin Steege (bio
Call #: 26449, 3 pts

Mondays 10:10am-12:00pm, 620 Dodge

This course engages close analytical study of selected works by Claude Debussy in conjunction with re- flections on modernism and modernity from literary- and critical - theoretical perspectives. A primary goal is to develop interpretive approaches that take rigorous account of how Debussy might be understood as "modernist" in the first place, and what "modernism" might mean in this context - questions that have been surprisingly little addressed in extant literature on the composer. Readings include work of Charles Baude- laire, Walter Benjamin, Hugo Friedrich, Paul de Man, Michel Foucault, Matei Calinescu, Barbara Johnson, T. J. Clark, and Jonathan Crary. Presentation and paper.

NEW COURSE: Musical Exoticisms of the Former Soviet Union (MUSI W4442/RUS 84442)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Musical Exoticisms of the Former Soviet Union
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI W4442
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Maria Sonevytsky (Postdoctoral Fellow, Harriman Institute)

MUSI W4442/RUSSIAN 84442 (New Course for Spring 2013)

Musical Exoticisms of the Former Soviet Union 
Instructor: Maria Sonevytsky (Postdoctoral Fellow, Harriman Institute)
Call #: 23331, 3 pts,

Thursdays, 10:10am-12:00pm, 701A Dodge

In this course, we explore musical discourses of "civilization" and "barbarism" with a focus on examples from Ukraine, Russia, and Central Asia. The historical scope of the class includes key moments since the 18th century through the present day. Topics will include music of the "Gypsies," Klezmer and Yiddish songs, music of the Carpathian Mountains, Crimean Tatars, Uzbeks, Siberian shamans, renowned Soviet composers, Eurovisions contestants, and Post-Soviet African-Ukrainiam hip-hop artists.

NEW COURSE: European Music in America (MUSI W4126)

Course Information

Course Title: 
European Music in America
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI W4126
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Davide Ceriani (Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Music)

 

MUSI W4126 (NEW COURSE FOR SPRING 2013)

European Music in America (1825-1950)
Instructor: Davide Ceriani (bio)
Call #: 76497, 3 pts

MW 2:40pm-3:55pm, 622 Dodge

The aim of this course is to provide a deeper understanding of the musical interactions between Europe and the United States from the first performance of an Italian opera sung in its original language in America (Gioachino Rossini's Il barbiere di Siviglia, 1825) until Arnold Schoenberg's death in Los Angeles in 1951. The course will address issues such as identity and cultural pride through music, the concept of a musical canon in America, and reception of European culture in the United States.

NEW COURSE: The Music and Writings of Wagner (MUSI W4102)

Course Information

Course Title: 
The Music and Writings of Wagner
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI W4102
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Walter Frisch

 

MUSI W4102  (NEW COURSE FOR SPRING 2013)
The Music and Writings of Wagner
Instructor: Walter Frisch (bio)
Call #: 96756, 3 pts


MW 10:10am-11:25am, 814 Dodge

The development of Wagner's musical-dramatic style and critical thought, with special reference to The Flying Dutchman, Lohengrin, Die Walkure, Tristan und Isolde, and Parsifal, as well as selected prose writings in translation.

NEW COURSE: Popular Music and Protest Movements (AFASW4031/MUSI 8031)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Popular Music and Protest Movements
CU Directory Course Number: 
AFAS W4031
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Kevin Fellezs (Spring 2013)

AFAS W4031/MUSI 84031
NEW COURSE for SPRING 2013!

Popular Music and Protest Movements
Instructor: Prof. Kevin Fellezs (bio)
Call #: 61032, 3 pts, 

T 4:10pm-6:00pm 
758 Schermerhorn Extension

"Music doesn't lie. If there is something to be changed in this world, then it can only happen through music." Jimi Hendrix This course will examine the relationship between popular music and popular movements in various historical and social contexts with an emphasis on African American musicians and political issues. We will trace various legacies within popular music that fall under the rubric of "protest music" as well as to think about the ways in which popular music has assisted various commu- nities to speak truth to power. We will also consider the ways in which the impact of the music industry has either lessened or enhanced popular music ?s ability to articulate "protest" or "resistance."

Introduction to the History of Music Theory (MUSI G6300, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Introduction to the History of Music Theory
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G6300
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Benjamin Steege

Fall 2012 Music G6300
HISTORY OF MUSIC THEORY FROM RAMEAU TO RIEMANN
Call Number: 28991 Points: 3
Day/Time: M 10:10am-12:00pm  [NB: change of time]
Location: 620 Dodge
Instructor: Prof. Benjamin Steege (bio)

Survey of European music-theoretical perspectives from roughly 1720 to 1920.  This period witnessed the consolidation of the field of "modern" theory that continues to inform contemporary discourse.  In addition to tracing the emergence of novel theoretical topics--from "form" to "function"--we will address the relation of music theory to the new or modernizing fields it productively interacted with: physics, aesthetics, historiography, hermeneutics, physiology, psychology, and so on.  Texts will be read in connection with the analysis and interpretation of relevant musical repertories.

Readings are drawn from translation, but knowledge of French and/or German is very useful.  Presentations and final paper.

NEW SEMINAR: Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Popular Music Aesthetics (MUSI G9403, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Popular Music Aesthetics
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G9403
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof Kevin Fellezs

Fall 2012 Music G9403
ADVANCED ETHNOMUSICOLOGY SEMINAR: POPULAR MUSIC AESTHETICS
Call Number: 66547 Points: 3
Day/Time: T 6:10pm-8:00pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Prof. Kevin Fellezs (bio)

Click here to view the description and syllabus for this course.  (PDF)

Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Caribbean New York (MUSI G9401, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Caribbean New York
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G9401
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Christopher Washburne

Fall 2012 Music G9401
ADVANCED SEMINAR-ETHNOMUSICOLOGY I: CARIBBEAN NEW YORK
Call Number: 76972 Points: 3
Day/Time: T 9:00am-10:50am
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Prof. Christopher Washburne (bio)

Seminar in Historical Musicology: Romantic Period (MUSI G8109, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Seminar in Historical Musicology: Romantic Period
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G8109
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Walter Frisch

Fall 2012 Music G8109
SEMINAR in HISTORCAL MUSICOLOGY: ROMANTIC PERIOD
Section 001 Call Number: 14923 Points: 3
Day/Time: W 2:10pm-4:10pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Prof. Walter M Frisch (bio)

NEW COURSE: Music and Place (MUSI G4461, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Music and Place
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G4461
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Ellen Gray

Fall 2012 Music G4461
MUSIC AND PLACE
Section 001 Call Number: 17049 Points: 3
Day/Time: R 12:10pm-2:00pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Ellen Gray (bio)

This course provides an introduction to contemporary work on music and place from an ethnomusicological perspective. It situates ethnomusicological work and specific musical case studies from multiple geographical regions within an interdisciplinary theoretical framework that draws from the fields of cultural anthropology, cultural, media, and sound studies.

Listening and Sound in Cross-Cultural Perspective (MUSI W4430, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Listening and Sound in Cross-Cultural Perspective
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI W4430
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa

Fall 2012 Music W4430
LISTENING AND SOUND IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE
Section 001 Call Number: 13346 Points: 3
Day/Time: MW 1:10pm-2:25pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa (bio)

The objective of this course is to explore the relationship between listening, sound and music across different cultures and in different historical moments and contexts. This will be explored through recent histories of listening, through anthropological work on hearing and sound in different cultures and through the field of acoustic ecology. The course will seek to compare these three scholarly perspectives and their contributions to a historical and contextual understanding of listening practices.

Meets Global Core Requirements.  Meets CSER major requirements.

NEW COURSE: Puccini and the 20th Century (MUSI W4125, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Puccini and the 20th Century
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI W4125
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Dr. Arman Schwartz (ACLS Postdoctoral Fellow)

Fall 2012 Music W4125
PUCCINI AND THE 20TH CENTURY
Section 001 Call Number: 87796 Points: 3
Day/Time: T 1:10pm-3:00pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Arman R Schwartz (ACLS Postdoctoral fellow, bio)

The popular and academic reputations of Giacomo Puccini have diverged more sharply than those of any other classical composer. This course aims less to "rehabilitate" Puccini than to imagine an alternate history of modernism in which his music plays a central role. Discussions will be centered around six operas, which we will be listening to in their entirety, as well as a variety of films, stage productions, and works by other composers. Major themes will include: sound studies and the history of technology; performance studies; theories of realism and modernism; and the relationship between Italian cultural politics and larger cosmopolitan and imperial formations.

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